Saturday, February 5, 2011

Writing History

What happened in Egypt on the 25th of January 2011 could be analogized as a 15 year old child that went into a coma for 30 years. He/she finally wakes up trying to identify his/her environment without being constrained to the state of unconsciousness he/she was subjected to. As a nation, there was a consensus on a common goal known as “Change”. Today, we are troubled by our own thoughts channelled through our surrounding, environment, and media. We are not sure whether to be happy or worried, emotional or rationale, confident or insecure. In the state of political discovery, our nation got categorized in various political ideologies. On the left wing, you got the Socialists/Communists, Liberal Secularist, and nationalists. On the right wing, you got the Conservatives, Fundamentalists (hoping for a Theocracy), and other form of neo-conservatism.

Instead though, we have categorized those masses into two groups to make it easier to identify. The groups are the Pro Mubarak and the Anti-Mubarak. We put no regard that members within each group vary in ideologies that contradict one another. (Example: the Muslim Brotherhood theocratic thought and Al Baradei’s Liberal/secular though)

A state of solidarity started to fade, leading to the weakening of the nationalism fever that was unexpectedly spread in an event other than football. All of a sudden, we all became political analysts holding informal degree in fields like political science/thought/management, law, doctrine studies, and economics.

Back to the categorizing, the following points below are samples from each party’s demand list:-

The Pro-Democracy/Anti-Mubarak
- If Tunis could do it, so could we. (Competitive)
- We want the president to leave immediately. (Determined)
- We want a democracy and constitutional reforms NOW. (Hopeful)
The Pro-Democracy/Pro-Mubarak
- Egypt will not be compared to any other nation. (Proud)
- We want our president to leave with honour as he was a solider in the prestigious army of the Egyptian Forces. (Loyal)
- Constitutional reforms followed by a democratic system will succeed using the art of “gradualism”. (Rational)

So together, we are Proudly Competitive and Loyally Determined. However, we are Emotionally Rational. In the past thirty years we lived in a Kleptocracy/Aristocracy ruled by an authoritarian rule under a form of governmental claimed to be a democratic “Republic”.

After Jan 25, we started living in a “direct democracy” (which was used during the Greek city of Athens for a reason) with no background to the frameworks of a “representative democracy” (The electoral representation of power used in all democratic sovereignties). Today, we live in an “Anarchist society”. (A state of lawlessness due to the absence or inefficiency of the supreme power)

Tomorrow, we become Iraq’s instability with Congo’s Economy.

We are not a nation that enjoys a civic culture that allows us an easily transition of governmental form. To seek a historical reference, we should probably focus on the French revolution due to the similarities between our current situation and their historical experience. Five revolutions with countless bloodshed were the cost of their liberation and the establishment of their civic culture. The question is, should we let history repeat itself in our nation?

After presenting the analysis, allow me to give you my final thoughts. Our nation is in trouble. We could be taking some actions thinking it might be patriotic and those who don’t follow our path are accused to be infiltrators. A democracy to Egypt is equivalent to Plato’s Republic or Sir Moore’s Utopia. Democracy is very idealistic idea to Egypt right now. In 10 days, the youth changed the Egyptian history with no political power whatsoever. Now, let us allow the government to act. Let us allow our nation to grow, let us allow our hurt to heal, and let us allow our vengeance to be composed. Let us work for our idealistic dream rather than surrender to our inevitable reality.

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